Brian Gardner's Blog

Archives for Trade & Industry

Not so free trade?

Britain’s splendid, free-booting, liberal traders, now leading the UK into the economic wild blue yonder, believe that most of the world’s trading nations will be queuing up to sign lots of lovely, lucrative trade deals as the country breaks away from the European Union. They are in for a nasty shock. Most obviously, most of… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

The apparent enthusiasm of US President Donald Trump for a trade deal with the United Kingdom in its post-Brexit state should be regarded with considerable scepticism. The UK’s Brexiteer enthusiasts, currently suffering from the delusion that every major trading nation in the world is ‘queuing up to strike deals’ with London, should look at the… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

SUGAR: THE UNFINISHED REFORM

The recently published Court of Auditors critique of the European Union’s reform of the sugar market regime, enlightening in many ways, failed to emphasise the most important lacuna in the Council’s 2005 reform agreement – the failure to deal with the implicit plot against the consumer inherent in the EU’s sugar production quota system. The… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

With world food commodity prices rising again on the prospect of poor harvests in some of the major grain producing areas of the world, it is inevitable that the price of food in the shops will rise. What is also inevitable is that if and when supplies improve and bulk commodity prices fall again retail… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

Despite the existence of much information to the contrary, the myth of the poor European farmer persists. In most western countries of the European Union farms run as businesses make a good living – as good if not better than in other sectors of the economy. Real income data, rather than global averages, proves the… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

US HOLDS KEY TO DOHA

The Doha Round of trade liberalisation negotiations is well and truly stalled. No one is in any doubt about that. What there is doubt about however is: why? Developing country demands for greater farm subsidy reductions by the European Union and other developed countries, lack of access for European goods and services, US demands for… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner