Brian Gardner's Blog

Archives for CAP Reform

It is becoming ever clearer that there is no real intention on the part of the European Union’s agriculture ministers to agree any effective reforms of the EU agriculture policy. The Council of Agriculture ministers meeting at the beginning of this month indicated only too clearly that the final agreement for the 2014-20 MFF will… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

NO PRESSURE FOR CAP REFORM

So, predictably, the EU budget wrangle drags on. Equally predictably, spending on the cash-guzzling agricultural budget is at the heart of the argument. However the negotiations end up the annual spending on agriculture policy will still remain close to 40 per cent of the Union’s total spending. It doesn’t really matter whose version of the… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

The farm lobby’s supporters in the European Parliament are clearly determined on only minimal adjustments to the common agricultural policy in return for guarantees of the continuation of the €55 billion a year largesse from the taxpayer. Deliberations in the Agriculture Committee indicate strongly that MEPs will not support the Commission’s very modest plans for… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

It was entirely predictable that EU farm ministers would respond to the European Commission’s post 2013 CAP reform proposals by agreeing on a policy direction which would ensure that there can be no radical change in the Union’s €50+ billion a year common agricultural policy. What was however surprising, even to hardened farm council watchers,… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

The European Commission’s approach to yet another upcoming reform of the common agricultural policy is largely devoted to the continuation of the current policy with a few added concessions to green pressures on the side. This approach is increasingly irrelevant at this stage in the development of European agriculture and in an increasingly unstable world… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

Improved food security has long been a justification for protecting farmers. In the long history of European agriculture policy flinging up tariff walls and subsidising production has nearly always been the governmental response to the prospect of potential food shortage. The evidence that such actions generally result in a reduction of production outside the protected… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

The still relatively new UK Government believes that it can reform the CAP, settle the Doha Round and liberate the world’s agricultural markets. Subsidies will be phased out, import barriers and export restrictions removed and efficient farmers will face a brave new world of expanding markets and higher profits. ‘Oh, and while we are about… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner