Brian Gardner's Blog

Archives for food security

Governments aiming to achieve greater food security are unlikely to achieve it through greater self-sufficiency in food production. In fact, pursuit of self-sufficiency is likely to be a major cause of global food insecurity. The risks of food shortages are likely to be greater if barriers are raised against food imports and there is greater… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

The increasing prosperity of the world’s largest concentration of people – China – is likely to put increasing pressure on the world’s food supply. With a population of more than 1.3 million, an annual economic growth rate of c. 7.5 per cent, and a growing middle class, China is going to increase substantially its demand… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

Whatever dreams environmentalists may have of a world fed by a chemical-free organic agriculture, the hard reality is likely to be something very different. Laudable though the green farming paradigm may be, it is certain that a largely increased and more prosperous world population will only be fed by increased agricultural output. Such increase can… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

Whatever governments may or may not agree on GHG emissions, the one thing that is likely is that average global temperatures will continue to rise. What is also likely is that the world’s food production capacity will be affected by the change that temperature rises will create. There is however no consensus on what the… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

According to defenders of an unreformed European agriculture policy, current plans to harmonise and restrict EU farm income payments are likely to threaten viability of the agriculture industry and restrict output. Such an effect would, it is argued, pose a serious threat to the ability of the EU farm industry to improve both EU and… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

The farm lobby’s supporters in the European Parliament are clearly determined on only minimal adjustments to the common agricultural policy in return for guarantees of the continuation of the €55 billion a year largesse from the taxpayer. Deliberations in the Agriculture Committee indicate strongly that MEPs will not support the Commission’s very modest plans for… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner

The most recent meetings of the European Union’s farm ministers have given a pretty clear indication that any changes which may take place in the common agricultural policy are unlikely to be more than cosmetic. After much wrangling in the Special Committee on Agriculture (SCA) and in the Council of Ministers itself, a completely anodyne… » read more

Posted by Brian Gardner